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MUSIC HISTORY

 

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DDD and AAD Codes

 

The letters of these codes stand for either Digital or Analog equipment.The first letter refers to the initial recording, the second to mixing and editing, and the third to mastering.Mastering is always

 

digital, so there are just three codes:

 

AAD-analog recording, analog mixing, digital mastering

ADD-analog recording, digital mixing, digital mastering

DDD-digital recording, digital mixing, digital mastering

 

Generally, DDD is the highest level of recording and the one used by major artists today.However, any of the recording methods can sometimes sound better than the others, depending on the type of equipment and engineering skill.Analog recordings made on good equipment in the 1980ís can sometimes sound better than carelessly made digital recordings.

 

In actuality, most CDís are hybrids of various types of analog and digital processes.Sometimes performances were made years ago before digital technology, and they are remastered.Sometimes studios record some sounds in analog and others digitally, to emphasize certain tone qualities; this happens more in popular music, for drum and bass sounds, for example.Sometimes recordings do not need mixing.Sometimes the distinction between analog and digital is not significant.

 

Thus, while listeners may want to try to choose DDD recordings, any of the three recording types can sound great, depending on the skill of the engineering and quality of equipment.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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